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Curiosities
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·Cover ·20 ·47 ·74 ·101 §128
·Title ·21 ·48 ·75 ·102 ·129
·iii ·22 ·49 ·76 ·103 ·130
·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
·v ·24 ·51 ·78 ·105 ·131
·vi ·25 ·52 ·79 ·106 ·132
§Contents ·26 ·53 §80 ·107 ·Plate 2
·viii ·27 ·54 ·81 ·108 ·133
§1 ·28 ·55 ·82 ·109 ·134
·2 ·29 §56 ·83 ·110 ·135
·3 ·30 ·57 §84 ·111 ·Plate 3
·4 ·31 ·58 ·85 ·112 ·136
·5 ·32 ·59 ·86 ·113 ·137
·6 §33 ·60 ·87 ·114 ·138
·7 ·34 ·61 ·88 ·115 ·Plate 4
·8 ·35 §62 ·89 ·116 ·139
·9 ·36 ·63 ·90 ·117 ·Plate 5
·10 ·37 ·64 ·91 ·118 ·140
·11 ·38 ·65 ·92 ·119 ·Plate 6
·12 ·39 ·66 ·93 ·120 ·141
·13 ·40 ·67 ·94 ·121 ·142
·14 ·41 ·68 ·95 ·122 §Index
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·19 ·46 §73 ·100 ·127
 
AGGRY BEADS OF ASHANTEE.
though that is semi-transparent, of a bright blue, resembling cornelian, (which is frequently found in these countries,) and said to be obtained in the same manner as the Aggry bead. Isert describes them "as a sort of coral, with inlaid work." "The art of making beads," (says Mr. Bowditch,) "is entirely lost, or was never known in these parts. It is not improbable that, in the golden age of Egypt, she had communication with the Gold Coast; indeed, it has been thought, and perhaps not without some reason, that the Gold Coast is the Ophir of Solomon.* The variegated strata of the Aggry beads are so firmly united, and so imperceptibly blended, that the perfection seems superior to art: some resemble Mosaic work; the surfaces of others are covered with flowers and regular patterns, so very minute, and the shades so delicately softened one into the other, and into the ground of the bead, that nothing but the finest touch of a pencil could equal them. The agatized parts disclose flowers and patterns, deep in the body of the bead; and thin shafts of opaque colours, running from the centre to the surface. The natives pretend that imitations are made in the country, which they call boiled beads, alleging that they are broken Aggry beads, ground into powder and boiled together, and that they know them because they are heavier; but this I find to be mere conjecture among themselves, unsupported by anything like observation or discovery. The natives believe that, by burying the Aggry beads in sand, they not only grow but breed. The colouring matter of the blue beads has been proved by experiment to be iron; that of the yellow, without doubt, is lead and antimony, with a trifling quantity of copper, though not essential to the

* See Plate 2, figs. 8 to 15.