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·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
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CAMEO INCRUSTATION.
the pores of the impressed cake; and, when gradually dried, it will be fit for use. A brass mould, A, with a recess to receive the cake, and a hinged leverage to keep it in its position, B, is provided; so that the face of the cake, C, which is then embossed in relief, ranges with the circular form of the Glass vessel intended to be blown into it; and this, being heated to redness, is placed in the recess of the mould. In this state, the ball of hot Glass is introduced and expanded by the power of blowing, till it assumes the exact shape of the mould, and the cake adheres to the Glass. The cake is then released by the lever, and the glass reheated, with the cake adhering to it, as often as necessary to finish the article, (as usually practised by blowers in ordinary moulded Glass vessels); the cake and Glass vessel being annealed together, with its blow-over, which is afterwards finished by the Glass-cutter. When the Glass is cold, it is released from the cake by its absorption of cold water, and the intaglio impression upon the Glass will be found as sharp as the original die. A cake once used, seldom answers for a second impression. Mr. Tassie had, long before this process was patented, executed on the same principle imitations of small gems in solid Glass, very successfully, which suggested the application of the same invention to hollow vessels.

CAMEO INCRUSTATION.

Cameo Incrustation was unknown to the ancients, and was first introduced by the Bohemians, probably about a century since; and Bas-relief casts of busts, and medals, were entirely isolated by them within a coating or mass of white Flint Glass. The figure intended for incrustation must be made of materials that will require a higher degree of heat for their fusion than the Glass within which it is to be incrusted; these are china