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Curiosities
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·Cover ·20 ·47 ·74 ·101 §128
·Title ·21 ·48 ·75 ·102 ·129
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·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
·v ·24 ·51 ·78 ·105 ·131
·vi ·25 ·52 ·79 ·106 ·132
§Contents ·26 ·53 §80 ·107 ·Plate 2
·viii ·27 ·54 ·81 ·108 ·133
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·2 ·29 §56 ·83 ·110 ·135
·3 ·30 ·57 §84 ·111 ·Plate 3
·4 ·31 ·58 ·85 ·112 ·136
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·6 §33 ·60 ·87 ·114 ·138
·7 ·34 ·61 ·88 ·115 ·Plate 4
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·11 ·38 ·65 ·92 ·119 ·Plate 6
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·14 ·41 ·68 ·95 ·122 §Index
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PRESSED GLASS.
a public edifice, an incrustation of this kind will be a record ære perennius. The late Sir Jeffry Wyatville, in laying the first stone of one of the towers of Windsor Castle, adopted this mode of recording the event; and other architects of eminence have placed these incrusted inscriptions in the foundations of various public and private buildings.
A second patent was subsequently secured by the author, by which medals, arms, crests, &c., are accurately transferred from the dies on which they had been chased, to hollow Glass-ware, especially where numerous repetitions of arms of elaborate workmanship are required. This invention diminishes the expense of engraving, in transferring the pattern by means of cakes of tripoli, from the die to services of Glass-ware, and it has frequently been used with great advantage. It is, indeed, an improvement of Mr. Tassie's mode of accurately transferring small bas-reliefs or intaglio pictures, from any material to solid Glass.
The invention of pressing Glass by machinery has been introduced into England from the United States of America. It has not, however, realized the anticipations of manufacturers; for, by the contact of the metal plunger with the Glass, the latter loses much of the brilliant transparency so admired in cut Glass; hence, it is now chiefly used for common and cheap articles. The process of rewarming or fire polishing, after the pressure, has somewhat remedied this defect. The patent pillar moulded Glass for articles of table use, is more successful, as it preserves its transparent, pellucid brilliancy. The interior is smooth, and the exterior having a second gathering of fused Glass, is expanded by blowing, after it has been impressed by the mold; and by rewarming, technically called fire polishing, the Glass preserves its refractive brilliancy.