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GATHERING FROM THE FURNACE.
numerous small cracks, extending about half-way through the Glass. Although decomposed on the surface, part of it is rough, as if treated by sand friction, to produce a contrasted effect, such as is employed in our times. The recently fractured parts are quite bright, colourless, and transparent, and melt with the blow-pipe, (but not very readily;) proving the fragment to be artificial, and not real crystal, as at first the author was led to conjecture.

STATE OF THE FURNACE AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF
THE WEEK'S WORK.

After the fused Glass has been lowered in temperature, so as to reduce it from a watery condition of fluidity to about the consistence of honey or treacle, it is fit for gathering, as it is termed.
Gathering glass from the furnace.
Gathering is effected by the workman heating to nearly a red heat a hollow blowing iron, at the larger end; this he places in the pot, in contact with the surface of the metal, to which it instantly adheres; at the same time, the iron is kept in constant rotation by the blower until the requisite quantity of metal is gathered. Should a large quantity be wanted, the first gathering must be taken out of the pot, and cooled by exposure to the air; and when the lump is somewhat consolidated, another gathering upon it may be made from the surface of the metal, and even a third or fourth gathering, until mass enough has been accumulated to make as large an article as the workman is capable of handling. The weight of each gathering is increased in cubical proportions; the first gathering being