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·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
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DRUIDICAL GLASS.
Near Alberfraer Palace, in Wales, have frequently been found the Glain Neidyr, or Druid Holy Snakes. Of these, the vulgar opinion was,* that they were produced by snakes joining their heads together and hissing; that by such means, a kind of bubble like a ring was formed round the head of one of them, which the rest, by continually hissing, blew on till it came off at the tail, when it immediately hardened into a ring. Whenever found one of these "snake-stones," was to prosper in all his undertakings. Such Glass annulets are generally about half as wide as our finger-rings, but much thicker. They are usually of a green colour; but, some are blue, and others are curiously variegated with waves of blue, red, and white. They are, in fact, beads of Glass, which were used by the Druids as a charm to impose upon the vulgar.—(See page 12.)
Dr. Stukeley gives an account of a curious Glass vase, found near a body that was dug up at Chatteris, in the Isle of Ely: its exact figure, unfortunately, could not be ascertained, as it was broken; but Dr. Stukeley remarks: "What, I believe, our present Glass-makers cannot perform, many pipes proceeded from it but closed; I think ten in number. I never saw one like it, nor can I conjecture what its purpose was."
Camden records: "On the commons about Winstre, are, several barrows: in the largest were found two Glass vessels, between eight and ten inches high, with wide round mouths, containing about a pint of clear, greenish water; also, red Glass beads, and other ornaments and trinkets."†
Mr. C. Roach Smith, Secretary of the Archæological

* Camden's Britannia, vol. ii. p. 750. An account of this anguinum ovum, or serpent's egg, is given by Pliny—Nat. Hist. lib. xxix. c. 3.
† Camden's Britannia, vol. ii. p. 311, Derbyshire.