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·Title ·21 ·48 ·75 ·102 ·129
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·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
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§Contents ·26 ·53 §80 ·107 ·Plate 2
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·14 ·41 ·68 ·95 ·122 §Index
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WASTE OF GLASS.
execution of a large number, in a short time, of bad work, (as it is technically termed,) which perhaps all goes to one chair; whereas better work, at the same time, is required to be made by other chairs, of a much more remunerative nature, which is liable to cause a feeling of discontent and jealousy. The manager needs a sense of strict justice, tact, and good humour, to keep himself popular with his men. Decision with promptitude, founded on justice, is always respected and obeyed by operatives, who are never insensible to the suaviter in mode, even when accompanied by the fortiter in re. A gentlemanly, well-educated manager is, therefore, usually most successful.

WASTE OF GLASS.

Much waste of Glass takes place in working the fused metal into wares. The greatest waste is incurred by the wine-glass workmen, who scarcely convert into wares one third of the fused Glass, although they gather from the middle of the pot, where the metal is always most free from striæ, &c. The least waste is occasioned by the phial blowers, who use above two-thirds of the metal they gather from the top and bottom of the pot, where the metal is comparatively impure. The average waste cullet, ladled, or skimmed metal, of the whole of the chairs, is about fifty per cent., or one-half, which is chiefly used again as cullet in the batch of the following week; but every re-melting deteriorates the quality. The loss in broken Glass, in small fragments on the floor of the Glass-House, or elsewhere, is not a very material item; but profits are often seriously reduced by loss of metal through broken pots. The waste, or cullet, &c., is carefully collected and picked,