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Curiosities
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·Title ·21 ·48 ·75 ·102 ·129
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·iv ·23 ·50 ·77 ·104 §Plate 1
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§Contents ·26 ·53 §80 ·107 ·Plate 2
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·3 ·30 ·57 §84 ·111 ·Plate 3
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·14 ·41 ·68 ·95 ·122 §Index
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·19 ·46 §73 ·100 ·127
 
TUMBLER.
that the blacks, or parts adhering to the blowing-iron, may be selected for inferior purposes, or for Glass of a light green colour. Loss by waste and casualties may be estimated at ten per cent.
Formerly, under the Excise laws, makers received a very inadequate allowance for waste, which had to be accounted for weekly; and at least seven and a half per cent. loss would have accrued to the manufacturer, unless he had evaded the law, by bringing as many casks of cullet from other parts of the premises, or weighing as much cullet twice over, as was necessary to make up the requisite weight. Excise officers permitted the evasion—certainly a questionable fraud—it being impossible to carry out the Act of Parliament, with justice to the manufacturer, without his resorting to self-defense. These facts were laid before Lord Goderich, then Mr. Robinson, who immediately passed an Act that remedied the evil which so long had been productive of evasion and immorality, without any security to the revenue.

TUMBLER.

One of the simplest articles to make by hand is the Tumbler; but great attention is required in the gathering, to obtain very clear Glass, free from stones, specks, or striæ; also, after marvering, it should be well fire-polished by re-heating or melting out the marver marks; thus removing the numerous irregular indentations generally attributed to bad quality, but entirely due to the carelessness of the workman. To preserve uniformity of weight, substance, and size, needs great experience and attention.