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    The first mention of the use of glazed windows in Great Britain was in the seventh century when Benedict of Wearmouth sent to France for workmen to glaze a church that he was building.
    The use of stained glass in small pieces for leaded windows was characteristic of the Gothic cathedrals in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. The old masters who mixed the colors for the variety of shades required in this wonderful art of the medieval stained glass windows attained a degree of skill that appears to have died with them, for we are forced to admit that our modern artisans cannot produce the depths of color and variety of shades attained in those times. This is especially true of the deep blues and purples found today in so many of the old world cathedrals and churches.
    These instances of the limited use of flat glass in window openings did not mean windows in the modern sense-- far from it.