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CHAPTER II

FLAT GLASS IN AMERICA

DEVELOPMENT of flat glass was slow in the New World as well as in the Old, until the modern era of industry arrived. Probably the first attempt to manufacture window glass in the United States was in Allowaystown, New Jersey, in 1738. This venture was unsuccessful as was a later attempt by Robert Hewes, who, in 1790, started a small window glass factory in a forest near Concord, new Hampshire. A few years later, in 1797, Gallatin and Company started a window glass factory in New Geneva, Pennsylvania, ninety miles south of Pittsburgh. This factory proved fairly profitable, the glass at that time selling for $7.00 per box of fifty feet, 10 inches by 10 inches in size.