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    The use of coal as fuel in glass-making brought a decided change. Previously the industry had been a wandering one, moving from place to place as the need for fresh fuel arose. The use of coal made possible steady development at one place.
    O'Hara and Craig established at Pittsburgh in 1797 the first window glass plant to use coal.
    The first really successful window glass factory in the United States was that of the Boston Crown Glass Company of Boston, Massachusetts. Chartered in 1787, it began operations in 1792, under very favorable conditions, being greatly assisted by the liberal action of the state legislature.
    The legislature exempted the company from taxes and their workmen from military duty. It also gave them exclusive rights for fifteen years to manufacture window glass in Massachusetts.
    In 1798, records show that this company produced window glass to the value of $82,000.