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Many were the modification made in Edward Hayward's own hand to proofs submitted for approval by the firm's printers, Messrs. Pardon and Son, of Paternoster Row. Whether it was a spiral staircase, a coal plate, or the Imperial Union Bath to be illustrated, the printer was enjoined to see that each nicety of design was faithfully reproduced as in the original.
    The Union Kitchen Range appears to have been nearest to Edward Hayward's heart and this was extensively advertised both locally, by circular, and in the national press: "Hayward Brothers respectfully solicit a visit from architects and the public to see their Union Kitchen Range in use, also their model bathroom, in which is shewn the bath heated from the kitchen range or from the independent bathroom fire."
    The Union Kitchen Range was exhibited at the Architectural Exhibition held at 9, Conduit Street in 1862. Even at that early date, facsimile letters in Edward Hayward's handwriting were printed by the thousand for this form of advertising. The description of the firm altered slightly from time to time as new items appeared in the catalogues. From "Furnishing Ironmongers", they progressed to "Builders' and Manufacturing Ironmongers" becoming "Hot Water Engineers" with the introduction of bathroom facilities and so on through the many phases of development.
    Two years later, the small office reserved for Edward Hayward's use in Cornhill became the first official City offices of Hayward Brothers. The senior Mr. Leggatt of Leggatt, Hayward and Leggatt had retired in 1861 and in 1869, when the second Mr. Leggatt died, the style of this old-established firm became Hayward and Leggatt. Edward Hayward, the sole surviving partner in the print selling venture, made what use he could of the premises until the sons of his late partner were old enough to take control. He was getting on in years and his heavy commitments in the Borough would have made it impossible for him adequately to have managed both businesses, so for a few years the picture concern was allowed to lapse.