Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 55 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 57 Navigation
YOR: 57 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
indication that he gave Eckstein his head, remaining in the background, as he had during his brother's lifetime, ready to give counsel and advice.
    To simplify manufacture, it was arranged to form a separate company, the Southwark Foundry Company, whose functions would be to make iron castings required by Hayward Brothers and Eckstein. For this purpose, a site was purchased in Orange Street, off Union Street, adjoining the firm's premises. Here, a new foundry was built equipped with the most modern facilities and the latest types of plant. Haywards' own works, although efficient and extensive, had necessarily grown up bit by bit from the days of Glover and Henly in their single cottage. Such development lacked cohesion and the advantages of overall planning and design. These, it was determined, the new foundry should possess.
    Originally, it had also been planned that in addition to Haywards' requirements, the new company should accept outside orders, which proved so formidable that they soon monopolised the foundry. Ways and means of satisfying the ever-increasing demands of production had therefore to be considered.
    In 1891, William Hayward retired from the business with which he had been so closely connected for over forty years. This not only severed a personal link but brought the long family saga to a close. Neither he nor his brother, Edward, had had a son and such Hayward cousins as they knew were pre-occupied with their own businesses.
    Writing many years ago, H. T. Walker recorded this event: "We not regretfully part company with so brilliant a member of the firm," a sentiment here repeated without its context because those words where written by a man not only with forty years' service to his own credit but by one who, if he did not actually work with William Hayward, knew and spoke with many others whose memories went back to the time when William Hayward was a young and enthusiastic junior partner under his elder brother.
    William Hayward lived in retirement for eleven years after he withdrew from active participation in the business and died in