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ironwork of great variety. This firm competed to some extent with Hayward Brothers and although in the main they pursued contrasting types of business, similar methods and materials of manufacture made a merger sound and logical.
    By a deed of 1891, J. A. Willmore entered into partnership with William Eckstein, and Cottam and Willmore ceased to exist as a separate entity. The name, to which considerable goodwill was attached, was retained and applied to that part of the manufacture originating in that firm. J. G. Willmore, son of J. A. Willmore, and other members of the staff of Cottam and Willmore also joined Hayward Brothers and Eckstein at the same time. The principals of the two businesses had been at some pains to ensure a smooth welding together of their respective interests. To assist these arrangements, J. A. Willmore devoted his time mainly to the works, sharing the office organisation and management with Eckstein as required, and particularly in the absence of Eckstein who travelled extensively in the firm's interest. The amalgamation resulted in yet another site being acquired in Orange Street. Before the year was out, the complete block from Union Street to Orange Street had been re-built and adapted for the occupation of the enlarged concern.
    Just as Haywards had passed through many stages, long past, such as the Union Bath and "bell-hanging," so had Cottam and Willmore indulged in the fancies of the moment. The Patent Spring Bed, which they advertised widely before abandoning it, does not from its illustration suggest the perfect cure for insomnia. Ingeniously constructed, it could serve as a settee, as a couch permitting the legs to stretch at will while the head was arrested as in a dentist's chair, as a bed for sleeping, or for the convenience of surgeons, masseurs and other professional persons, or folded for light week-end travel. However one may smile, it represents the beginning of an idea which has been successfully exploited since by other firms to great advantage.
    Once J. A. Willmore had been installed and had picked up the threads of the business sufficiently to conduct it single-handed,