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    Shortly after the first world war, many of the younger architects were working in concrete rather than in the traditional brick and stone. When Regent Street was rebuilt many of the new pavement lights were in concrete. Until then, orders for these had been spasmodic and limited. But here was an example of planning and preference on a large scale at the very centre of things which it would have been madness to discount. While opinion fluctuated between the merits of the two methods, iron and concrete, or between old tried methods and new unknown alternatives, Haywards had been content to await events. Although opinion on the Board was divided, the period between was one of watchful caution.
    The use of this new material was but a variation of that old theme rendered with such success by Edward Hayward sixty years before, namely bringing light to dark places. The principle remained the same, affected only in detail by modern progress.
    The adjustment from iron to concrete production raised many questions but the main one, whether to compete in this market, had already been answered. Despite the entirely new technique demanded after over a century in iron, the task was attacked with energy and precision. Some premises adjacent to Union Street were rented to meet immediate needs. A careful balance was maintained so as to safeguard the valuable connection in iron pavement lights for which heavy demands still continued. The possibilities arising naturally from concrete production, such as concrete sashes, lantern lights and other items were vigorously explored.
    It was at this time that the company, in association with the glass works who had supplied their lenses for many years, introduced what became known as "W" glass, scientifically produced to withstand the treatment to which pavement lights were subjected, sudden shock, changes of temperature and other hazards.
    The Building Trades' Exhibition of 1930 gave a fillip to trade. The company had not exhibited for many years and much thought was given to ensure success. Many did not realise the