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ELECTRO-GLAZING LUXFER PRISMS.

    Electro-glazing is a process by which small pieces of glass, such as prism lenses, may be united together to form a broad thin plate. These plates, composed of Luxfer Prisms, when used in windows, must be strong enough to resist high wind pressures. The old cathedral glass, composed, as it is, of small pieces leaded together, or united by zinc or other such framing, is found to be very weak. Such windows have to be supported by rods and bars, and even then windows are constantly giving away under the pressures of high winds. It is found by actual test that pieces of glass thus electro-glazed together and without supporting bars constitute a plate capable of resisting a higher wind pressure than a plate of the same size composed of a solid mass of such glass.
    These prism plates must also, if used for window lights, be wind and water tight. Electro-glazing accomplishes this result, for the deposited metal becomes so intimately connected with the edges of the prism lenses that the copper and glass become, as it were, welded together, neither wind nor water being able to penetrate between the frame and the prism lens. This is found by actual experience to be true under all conditions of the widest variation in temperatures, from the extreme heat of summer to the extreme cold of winter. This is not true of other methods by means of which such prism lenses might be united. Thus it happens that where such prism lenses are glazed by means of lead, zinc, brass or other such frames, the varying contraction and expansion of the prism lenses and the frame result necessarily in loosening the cement. No cement work can possibly be permanently effective, and the same cause which renders the cement necessary makes it perishable. A thin frame, with a limited amount of cement, may hold the prism lenses in position for a short time, or until the contractor can deliver his job and get his money, but it is certain soon to disintegrate and the lenses to loosen. All these difficulties are obviated by the use of electro-glazing.
    In the use of prisms it is desirable to get the greatest possible prism area, because the opaque portions of the frame or the plane surface of glass about the prism surface
  Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 12