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1906 Sweet's
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EXPANSION JOINTS.      These are arranged at required distances, and provide for such movement as may take place on account of expansion or contraction of the slab.
Fig. 11. SIDEWALK VAULT LIGHTS, PERSPECTIVE
FIG. 11. SIDEWALK VAULT LIGHTS, PERSPECTIVE
FREEDOM FROM
CONDENSATION.
    Concrete being a poor conductor of heat, the condensation with other systems is wholly avoided.
NO EXPOSED IRON.     Iron plates, ordinarily used, are entirely omitted in this system, thus doing away with the joints which cause such endless difficulty, and eliminating the danger from slipping on exposed metal surfaces. Fig. 12. FINISHED SLAB OF GLASS AND CONCRETE
FIG. 12. FINISHED SLAB OF GLASS AND CONCRETE
COMPLETED
WORK.
    The top surface is rubbed down smooth, presents a fine appearance, and makes an excellent wearing pavement.
The under-surface may be pointed and painted, or it may be plastered flush with the bottom of the lenses with cement or white mortar. This is the only system to which such a finish can be applied.
ADAPTABILITY.     This system is particularly desirable for quick setting-- the materials are always ready and can be assembled and set without the usual delay necessitated in making patterns and castings. Fig. 13. TEST BY CONCENTRATED LOAD
FIG. 13. TEST BY CONCENTRATED LOAD
Of 11,882 lbs. applied on disc 8½ inches in diameter
TESTS OF STEEL
CONCRETE
SIDEWALK
SLAB.
    Cuts 12, 13 and 14 illustrate the method and results of strength test of steel-concrete sidewalk vault light slab recently made by Tucker & Vinton, and under the direction of Mr. Wm. Barclay Parsons, Chief Engineer of the New York Rapid Transit Railway. For this test two twelve-inch I-beams thirteen and one-half feet long were spaced five feet apart, center to center, and supported by blocking at their extremities. Between these two beams were set three five inch I-beams, with their tops two inches below the flange of the twelve-inch beams. The vault light slab rested on this framework, but was not in any way connected to it. This slab was two inches thick, except over the five-inch beams, where fillers were provided to give it bearing upon them. The constriction of the slab is shown by Fig. 12.