Home Index Site Map Up: Patent Index Navigation
Up: Patent Index
206,332 · Hyatt · "Improvement in the Application of Cements, Clays, Metals and Glass in forming Illuminated or Other Gratings, Vault-Covers, Roofs, &c."· Page 3
Home  > Prism Glass  > Patent Index  > Page 3
First: 206,332 · Hyatt · "Improvement in the Application of Cements, Clays, Metals and Glass in forming Illuminated or Other Gratings, Vault-Covers, Roofs, &c."· Page 1 Last: 206,332 · Hyatt · "Improvement in the Application of Cements, Clays, Metals and Glass in forming Illuminated or Other Gratings, Vault-Covers, Roofs, &c."· Drawing 6 Prev: 206,332 · Hyatt · "Improvement in the Application of Cements, Clays, Metals and Glass in forming Illuminated or Other Gratings, Vault-Covers, Roofs, &c."· Page 2 Next: 206,332 · Hyatt · "Improvement in the Application of Cements, Clays, Metals and Glass in forming Illuminated or Other Gratings, Vault-Covers, Roofs, &c."· Page 4 Navigation
206,332: 3 of 14

The tiles may be molded upon the gratings, or made separately and attached to them in manner as represented. The construction may also be such as to conceal the rafters, the tiles overlying them. These tiles may also be made of baked clay; and the hereinabove-described manner of constructing roofs constitutes a part of my invention.
    Fig. 12 represents substantially the same construction applied to walls where the light iron T-posts do the work of the roof-rafters, the spaces between them being closed substantially in the manner already described with respect to roofs. A number of these T-posts being established at convenient distances apart upon the foundation of the house, concrete beams are laid upon them and a concrete floor supported upon such beams. The bays or spaces between the piers or posts will be light or dark, according as the gratings forming the weather-surface are blocked with glass or with opaque material.
    Another part of my invention consists in applying the spider-web gratings as movable portions of weather and walking surfaces. Thus far I have represented them as fixtures, being very much lighter than the ordinary cast-iron gratings, and tougher, and hence not easily broken. They make excellent flap-doors for roofs and walking-surfaces, and I apply them for these purposes by the usual mechanical adaptations, which it is not necessary to here illustrate, the matter being readily comprehended by any one skilled in the art of building. Where light is not required in these and the aforementioned constructions, I sometimes, for the sake of lightness, close the gratings with papier-maché. In other cases, where glasses are employed, I coat the frame-work or grating of metal with papier-maché, setting the glasses directly in the same.
    Another part of my invention consists in setting the spider-web gratings with thick plates of polished glass, to render the same transparent as well as translucent in forming permanent or fixed as well as movable weather-surfaces, such as windows, the same being, to a degree, burglar-proof as well as fire-proof.
    Stone or cement gratings.-- Another part of my invention consists in combinations of glass with hydraulic cements, particularly the magnesian, molded either directly upon the glasses or molded separately in the form of stone gratings or perforated stone plates. These stone gratings may be made of sizes small or large, according to the strength of the materials employed, magnesian cement being stronger than Portland.
    Fig. 13 represents a stone grating ten inches in diameter and one inch and a half thick, the apertures being closed by glass. A part of this invention consists in forming the light holes with splayed or flaring under faces to spread the light, the glasses being designedly placed at considerable distances from one another, for the purpose of producing
an ornamental or safe walking foot-surface at top. Another part of this part of my invention consists in molding the aforesaid stone lights or stone gratings in colors, and combining the same by means of a foundation-grating of metal to form weather and walking surfaces, each stone grating or stone mount being cemented to the metal grating the same as glasses are secured in the seats or apertures thereof.
    Fig. 11 represents a single glass in a cement mount, and Fig. 15 represents a grating set with such mounted glasses.
    By these two modes of combination-- viz., glasses in clusters, as in Fig. 13, and single glasses, as in Fig. 14-- and their combination with metallic gratings, concrete or artificial-stone safe-walking illuminating-surfaces of any size and to any extent may be made; and by forming these mounts and stone gratings in colors, or with colored wearing-faces, and in geometrical or design shapes, like Minton pavement-tiles, and combining them with each other, I make walking and weather and other surfaces of great utility and beauty, a part of my invention consisting in making the aforesaid stone gratings and mounts of Portland or equivalent hydraulic cement, combined with a wearing-surface of the Sorel or magnesian cement, the Portland cement or concrete being first tamped around the glass or glasses in the mold to the required depth, and then the Sorel being put upon it and well tamped down, the two cements adhering perfectly and making a perfect bond.
    As one variety of manufacture, I make the aforesaid stone gratings and mounts with a party-colored or variegated face by peculiar means, which means also forms a part of my invention.
    Ordinary seagliola is made from materials not well adapted to bear exposure to the weather, and particularly not adapted for being walked upon.
    Now, my invention consists in making a new kind of seagliola, capable of withstanding weather and wear, and useful for all the purposes to which the common material and similar imitations of variegated marbles are supplied, (a special patent for which and its applications I propose hereafter to apply for.) This new material I make as follows: I first make cakes or tablets of hydraulic cements in colors, making use of the magnesian, especially and principally because of its pure white character, as a base for mixing with suitable pigments, or with pulverized and suitably-prepared colored marbles and other stones and materials. Having in this way formed my design colors, on the cakes becoming sufficiently hard and friable, I proceed to reduce them to fragments of irregular shapes and of various dimensions. These fragments I now employ, in combination with hydraulic cement as a binder, to form the new scagliola, working, forming, casting, and molding the same into