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211,297 · Dale · "Improvement in Illuminating Tiles for Covering Vaults, &c." · Page 1
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Patents: 105 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
WILLIAM DALE, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

First: 112,428 · Dale · "Improvement in Covers for Openings in Sidewalks" · Page 1 Last: 211,297 · Dale · "Improvement in Illuminating Tiles for Covering Vaults, &c." · Drawing 2 Prev: 156,412 · Dale · "Improvement in Vault-Covers" · Page 1 Next: 112,428 · Dale · "Improvement in Covers for Openings in Sidewalks" · Page 1 Navigation
William Dale
3 of 3
IMPROVEMENT IN ILLUMINATING-TILES FOR COVERING VAULTS, &c.
Specification forming part of Letters Patent No. 211,297, dated January 14, 1879; application filed December 12, 1878.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, WILLIAM DALE, of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Illuminating-Tiles for Covering Vaults and Cellar-Areas, which are fully set forth in the following specification:
    This invention is especially applicable to extension-areas, which require several sections of illuminating-tile to cover them. Heretofore in constructing and applying illuminating-tiles to extension-areas, a cast-iron frame, with supporting-ribs or cross-bars at suitable intervals, has been fitted into the stone coping, and the illuminating tiles or plates, cast separately from said frame, have been bolted or screwed clown upon said cross-bars.
    My improvements consist, first, in casting each section of the illuminating-tile with a supporting-rib or cross-bar having an offset or shoulder, to receive and support the adjacent section, all in one piece, adapted to fit directly into the coping, without a surrounding metal frame, thus obviating the necessity of any such frame as has heretofore been used; secondly, in making the supporting-rib or cross-bar of each section so shallow that it will not obstruct the oblique rays of light passing through the glasses, and re-enforcing it by a tension-truss, as hereinafter more fully described.
    In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of an area-cover consisting of three sections of tile, fitted into a stone coping. Fig. 2 represents a vertical cross-section of the same, on the irregular line x x, Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the sectional tiles. Fig. 4 is a side view of the same, showing one end fitted into the stone coping, and the other end resting upon an angle-iron attached to the wall of the building. Fig. 5 is a side sectional view of a series of risers and steps composed of illuminating-tiles, on line y y, Fig. 6. Fig. 6 is a rear view of the same. Fig. 7 is a side view of one sectional tile supported upon angle-irons attached to the coping as well as to the wall. Fig. 8 shows another way of supporting the tile upon the coping when the latter is too thin to bear rabbeting, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5.
    In the drawings I have represented the illuminating-tiles as consisting of a cast-iron plate in disk form, having perforations in it covered by glass bull's-eyes, and the spaces around and between the bull's-eyes filled with cement, as shown and described in Letters Patent No. 156,412, granted to me November 3, 1874, and other Letters Patent previously granted to me. It will be obvious, however, that my improvements are equally applicable to tiles in which the glass bull's-eyes or panes are set into a metal grating, coming flush with the upper surface of the glasses.
    A, Figs. 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8, shows the stone coping, and B, in same figures, (except 5,) shows the wall of the building. C, Figs. 1, 4, and 5, shows a rabbet cut in the stone coping, to receive and support the illuminating-tile. C', Fig. 7, shows an angle-iron attached to the coping, for the same purpose, and in Figs. 7 and 8 a similar angle-iron attached to the wall of the building, to receive and support the inner ends of the sectional tiles. C², Fig. 8, shows a recess cut in the upper surface of the coping, to receive a projecting lip, c, extending from the tile over the inner upper corner of the coping. D, in all the figures, shows the sectional tiles. o shows the glass bull's-eyes, covering perforations o' in the iron plate which forms the bottom of the tile; and D' represents the cement or concrete around and between the glasses, holding them firmly in position. E E, Fig. 3, shows two dovetailed webs cast on the upper surface of the bottom plate of the tile, which are to be entirely covered by the cement or concrete, and will serve to hold the same firmly down upon said plate.
    When the stone coping is too thin to bear rabbeting, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, I attach an angle-iron thereto, to support the tiles, as shown at C', Fig. 7; or a lip, c, may be cast upon the tile, to extend over the coping, and rest in a shallow recess cut therein, as shown at C2, Fig. 7; or said lip may be made to rest directly upon brick-work.
    Each sectional tile (except the one at the finishing end of the area-cover) has cast integrally with it a strengthening-rib or cross-bar, d, one-half of the width of which extends laterally beyond the edge of the tile upon which it