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Patents: 112 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
JACOB JACOBS, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

ILLUMINATING-TILE.
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Jacob Jacobs
4 of 57

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 231,805, dated August 31, 1880.
Application filed July 19, 1880. (Model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, JACOB JACOBS, of New York, in the county of New York, and in the State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Illuminating-Tiles; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof; reference being had to the accompanying drawings, making a part of this specification, in which--
    Figure 1 is a perspective view of the ring employed for holding the lens in my illuminating-tile. Fig. 2 is a like view of the same and of a lens separated from each other. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of said parts combined and ready for setting in a tile. Fig. 4 is a like view of a tile containing my improvements, and Fig. 5 is a cross-section of the same upon a line passing through the axes of two lenses.
    Letters of like name and kind refer to like parts in each of the figures.
    My invention is an improvement upon an illuminating-tile patented to me November 25, 1879, No. 222,053, in which the lenses were each surrounded by a ring of yielding material cast thereon, and then set in cement upon or within a metal grating. In the use of said tile great difficulty has been experienced in replacing a lens accidentally broken, it being necessary to remove the cement from around its encircling-ring and then to replace such cement after a new lens was in place- -an operation involving a considerable expense of time and money.
    The design of my invention is to obviate the necessity for removing the encircling metal band from or disturbing the bed of cement while removing or inserting a lens within a tile; and it consists in an illuminating-tile in which the glass lenses are each set in the usual manner within an inclosing-ring, and said ring set upon or within an iron grating over a suitable light-aperture, and surrounded by Portland cement or other like material applied in a plastic state, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter specified.
    In the application of my invention I employ a ring, A, composed of cast or sheet metal, glass, rubber, or other material having sufficient rigidity, which ring has the form of a plain cylinder with its lower end provided with an inward-projecting ledge, a.
    The ring A has such inside dimensions as
to permit of the insertion of a lens, B, which rests upon the ledge a, and is secured in place by means of brimstone cement, C, or any other water-proof packing usually employed for such purpose, said cement being placed between said ring and the periphery of said lens in the ordinary manner. The rings A are now placed upon a metal frame, B, over light-openings d, formed within the same, and the space between the peripheries of said rings and the flange d', which extends around the edge of said frame, is filled with Portland cement or other like material, applied in a plastic state, said plastic material operating to firmly secure said rings in place and to form around the same a water-proof non-slippery walking-surface. If desired, said rings may be first placed in position and the lenses afterward set, the latter operation being then precisely similar to that required where lenses are set directly within a metal-frame tile.
    Should a lens become broken it may be removed from place and a new lens placed in position without disturbance of the Portland cement, nothing more being necessary than to remove the packing C and substitute new packing when the new lens is in place, precisely as would be necessary in the case of the ordinary illuminating-tile.
    In my improved tile each lens is thoroughly protected from breakage or injury from the Portland-cement filling, and at the same time is as easily placed in or removed from position as in case of the illuminating-tiles ordinarily used.
    Having thus fully set forth the nature and merits of my invention, what I claim as new is--
    An illuminating-tile in which the glass lenses are each set in the usual manner within an inclosing-ring, and said ring set upon or within an iron grating over a suitable light-aperture, and surrounded by Portland cement or other like material applied in a plastic state, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
    In testimony that I claim the foregoing I have hereunto set my hand this 8th day of July, 1880.
JACOB JACOBS.
Witnesses:
    GEO. S. PRINDLE,
    GILBERT E. ROGERS.