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243,779 · Hyatt · "Walking-Surface of Illuminating-Gratings Employed to Cover Openings to Vaults and Underground Spaces" · Page 1
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Patents: 122 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
THADDEUS HYATT, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR TO
ELIZABETH ADELAIDE LAKE HYATT, OF SAME PLACE.

WALKING-SURFACE OF ILLUMINATING-GRATINGS EMPLOYED TO COVER OPENINGS TO VAULTS AND UNDERGROUND SPACES.
First: 4,266 · Hyatt · "Illuminating Vault Cover" · Page 1 Last: 365,306 · Hyatt · "Vault-Covering, Illuminating-Tiling, &c." · Drawing 2 Prev: 243,266 · Hyatt · "Concreted Illuminating-Grating" · Page 1 Next: 254,656 · Hyatt · "Illuminating-Grating" · Page 1 Navigation
Thaddeus Hyatt
42 of 67

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 243,779, dated July 5, 1881.
Application filed June 6, 1881. (No model.) Patented in England August 23, 1873, June 2, 1875, and November 23, 1875.
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, THADDEUS HYATT, of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Walking-Surfaces of Illuminating-Gratings Employed to Cover Openings to Vaults and Underground Spaces, which the following is a specification.
    The object of my invention is to make durable and safe the foot-surface of illuminating-gratings, which, in case of the glass, I accomplish by means of inlays of concrete or other material let into channels formed in the face of the glass, and by means of standing lines or of inlays made of metal or equivalent material for toughness, combined with the concrete when the same is put upon plain or flat plates or into channeled or recessed gratings or plates, the standing lines being cast upon the plate in the form of ornamental or plain figures, such as circles or rings, that form curbs around the light-holes for the reception of the glasses, a like effect being also produced by means of standing lines, blocks, or mounts cast upon the plate or let into the face of the concrete between the light-holes in design shape, and in forms such as vines, leaves, flowers, wreaths, &c., or in geometrical figures in imitation of mosaics, and the colored tiles, slips, and dots used for tessellated pavements, the metal lines determining the configuration of the concrete or body of the seeming inlays produced by this process.
    My invention having been described and illustrated up to a certain stage of its development-- viz., as shown in Figs. 1 to 6 in my English Patents No. 2,788, dated August 23, 1873, No. 2,015, dated June 2, 1875, and No. 4,063, dated November 23, 1875-- I shall confine myself in this specification (as to the claims made herein) to the features of the invention thus made public.
    In the drawings attached hereto and making part of this specification like letters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several figures, 1 to 8.
    A represents the floor-plate or grating; B, the glasses; C, the concrete and inlays; D,
metal inlays or standing lines at top; a a, the light-holes; b b, curbs or rims around the light-holes.
    Figure 1 is a plan view of a cast-iron floor-plate or grating, A, formed with reference to a filling of plastic concrete in its sunken surface. Its light-holes a a are closed by the glasses B B, set in the rims or rings b b, which curb the light-holes, C C being the concrete, put in plastic form between the rings and made flush with their tops D D. Fig. 2 is a cross-section of the same on the line x x. Fig. 3 is a plan view of a cast-iron floor plate or grating, substantially the same as Fig. 1, but formed with reference to solid ornamental inlays, the standing metal lines being cast in the form of square rims around the light-holes, so that the sunken portions or channels between the rims are bounded by parallel lines, and thus fitted to receive inlays of geometrical shape, as shown. The corner-spaces around the circular glasses within the square curbs or rims are filled with concrete, so that the foot-surface is composed of glass, concrete, metal, and inlays. Fig. 4 is a cross-section of the same on the line y y. Fig. 5 is a plan view of a channeled glass plate inlaid with concrete. Fig. 6 is a cross-section of the same. Figs. 7 and 8 represent an ornamental concrete surface, formed either by inlaying filigree or line metals let into the face of the concrete or by means of standing lines cast upon the floor-plate.
    The invention claimed herein consists of a grating or floor-plate the surface of which is made cellular or channeled between the glasses by means of standing collars or rims, which curb the light-holes, over which glasses are fitted within the rims. The channeled portion is then filled with concrete to the level of the tops of the collars, which makes a foot-surface of concrete and metal when the glass is below, and a surface of glass, metal, and concrete when the glasses are up to the level of the concrete and metal.
    The glasses employed in gratings, as represented by Figs. 1 to 4, are about one and a half inch diameter; but the glass plate represented by Figs. 5 and 6 may be twelve inches