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Patents: 168 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
JACOB JACOBS, OF NEW YORK, N.Y.

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Jacob Jacobs
8 of 57
ILLUMINATING-TILE.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 297,806, dated April 29, 1884.
Application filed February 16, 1884. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, JACOB JACOBS, of New York, in the county of New York, and in the State of New York, have invented certain new and useful improvements in Illuminating-Tiles; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, making a part of this specification, in which--
    Figure 1 is a perspective view of the upper side of my improved tile. Fig. 2 is a like view of the lower side of the same, and Fig. 3 is a section upon line x x of said figures.
    Letters of like name and kind refer to like parts in each of the figures.
    The design of my invention is to simplify the construction, to lessen the expense, and to improve the appearance of the lower or inner face of illuminating-tiles; to which end it consists, principally, in an illuminating-tile composed of a sheet-glass bottom and a superimposed body of cement provided with glass lenses, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter specified.
    It consists, further, in an illuminating-cover for areas, vaults, &c., composed of tiles having each a sheet-glass bottom and a superimposed body of cement provided with glass lenses, in combination with a supporting-frame which receives and contains said tiles, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter shown.
    In the application of my invention to practical use, I provide a suitable supporting-frame, A, which has any desired size, and is in all respects similar to those heretofore employed for the reception of illuminating-tiles of other construction. Where an area between the front wall of a building and the inner edge of a sidewalk is to be covered, the entire space may be inclosed by one tile, in which event a number of cross-beams, B, will be required at points between the ends of said area, or said space may be inclosed by means of any desired number of tiles each set within a separate frame, or within a panel of a frame which extends the entire length of said area. The supporting-frame A having been prepared, a sheet of glass, C, is first placed in position to form the bottom of the
tile, and upon said glass the lenses D are then placed in proper relative positions. Before placing said lenses in position the lower end of each, or the outer edge of such end, is coated with rosin, beeswax, or any similar adhesive preparation which will seal the space between said lens and said supporting-glass. If either of the articles named are employed, it will be necessary to soften it by heat; but any adhesive preparation may be used which is not soluble in water, and such preparation applied in a liquid state and then permitted to harden. After the lenses D are cemented in position, plastic cement E is placed within and caused to fill the space between and around the same until flush with their upper ends, and is then permitted to harden, after which the tile thus constructed is ready for us and is capable of sustaining any required load and of resisting any wear to which it would ordinarily be subjected. The adhesive preparation between the lower ends of the lenses D and the supporting-glass C prevents the cement E from passing beneath said lenses and leaves the lower end of each entirely unobstructed for the passage of light, while the supporting-glass C prevents dust or dirt from reaching such portions of said lenses, and forms a smooth, attractive, and easily-cleaned inner surface for the tile.
    Having thus fully set forth the nature and merits of my invention, what I claim as new is--
    1. An illuminating-tile composed of a sheet-glass bottom and a superimposed body of cement provided with glass lenses, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
    2. An illuminating-cover for areas, vaults, &c., composed of tiles having each a sheet-glass bottom and a superimposed body of cement provided with glass lenses, in combination with a supporting-frame which receives and contains said tile, substantially as and for the purpose shown.
    In testimony that I claim the foregoing I have hereunto set my hand this 3d day of January, 1884.
JACOB JACOBS.
Witnesses:
    HENRY C. HAZARD,
    GEO. S. PRINDLE.