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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
JACOB JACOBS, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

ILLUMINATING-TILE.
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Jacob Jacobs
17 of 57

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 402,930, dated May 7, 1889.
Application filed March 9, 1889. Serial No. 302,591. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, JACOB JACOBS, of New York, in the county of New York, and in the State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Illuminating-Tiles; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which--
    Figure 1 is a perspective view of the metal plate or body of my tile before the lenses are placed in position. Fig. 2 is a like view of the tile, the principal portion of the same being complete and a part having the lenses in position, but not cemented. Figs. 3 and 4 are perspective views of the lower side of said plate, and show, respectively, the light-openings unfilled and filled by lenses. Fig. 5 is a like view of said tile, provided with vitrified coverings for the metal lugs between the lenses; and Figs. 6 and 7 are sections upon lines x x and z z, respectively, of Figs. 2 and 5.
    Letters of like name and kind refer to like parts in each of the figures.
    The design of lily invention is to secure a large increased light-transmitting area of an illuminating-tile; and to such end my invention consists, principally, in an illuminating-tile in which the lenses are separated and located solely by means of lugs that are formed upon and project upward from the body of the tile at points midway between the contiguous light-openings, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter specified.
    It consists, further, in an illuminating-tile in which is combined a metal body that is provided with light-openings which have no surrounding curbs, and between such light-openings is provided with upwardly-projecting lugs, glass lenses which are placed over the light-openings, and cement or other like material that is placed within and caused to fill the space between the lenses, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter shown.
    It consists, further, in an illuminating-tile in which is combined a metal body that is provided with light-openings and upwardly-projecting lugs between the same, glass lenses which are placed over the light-openings, a cement that is placed within and caused to fill the spaces between said lenses, and
encaustic tiles which are embedded within the cement over each of the lugs, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter set forth.
    It consists, further, in an illuminating-tile in which the metal body is provided upon its lower face with a series of straight intersecting ribs that are located in each space between the contiguous light-openings, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter shown and described.
    It consists, finally, in an illuminating-tile in which the metal body is provided with light-openings that are without curbs, and upon its upper face has upwardly-projecting lugs between such openings, and upon its lower face is provided with straight intersecting ribs that are located between said openings, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter specified.
    In the carrying of my invention into practice I employ a metal plate, A, which has any desired size or shape horizontally, and is provided with parallel rows of circular light-openings a and a, that are placed near each other, as shown. Between the light-openings a and a are provided legs a' and a', which project upward from the plate A, and have each of their sides formed upon lines that are concentric with the contiguous openings. Around the edges of said plate there is preferably formed an upwardly-projecting flange, , which exteriorly is flush with said edges and interiorly follows the lines of the adjacent rows of openings a and a, so that its inner edge is composed of a series of connecting semicircular faces, each of which is concentric with one of said light-openings. Upon the lower face of the plate or tile A are formed intersecting ribs and , which are located between the light-openings a and a, and have such thickness and depth as will give to said plate the necessary rigidity to adapt it to the position it is to occupy, so that any desired strength maybe secured without other change than in the size of said ribs. Over each light-opening a is placed a lens, B, which is round in plan view, and in vertical section has preferably the form shown in Fig. 7, its body from the upper face of the tile A having an upwardly-decreasing diameter, while upon its lower side said lens is provided with a boss, b, that extends downward into said opening.