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Patents: 233 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
JACOB JACOBS, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

ILLUMINATING-TILE.
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Jacob Jacobs
22 of 57

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 428,493, dated May 20, 1890.
Application filed December 12, 1889. Serial No. 333,467. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, JACOB JACOBS, of New York city, in the county of New York, and in the State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Illuminating-Tiles; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which--
    Figures 1 and 2 are perspective views, respectively, of the upper and lower sides of my lens as preferably constructed. Fig. 3 is a like view from the lower side of said lens when provided with a modified form. Fig. 4 is a perspective view from the upper side of the lens when in position within the supporting-frame, and Figs. 5 and 6 are respectively sections upon lines x x and z z of Fig. 4.
    Letters of like name and kind refer to like parts in each of the figures.
    The object of my invention is to lessen the number of joints in an illuminating-tile and to reduce its cost without rendering it less efficient for the transmission of light, to which end such invention consists, principally, in the construction of the lenses and their combination with the supporting-frame, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter specified.
    It consists, further, in the construction and combination of the lens and encaustic tiles, substantially as and for the purpose hereinafter shown.
    In the carrying of my invention into practice I employ a lens A, which has a square form in plan view, and upon its upper face is provided with cylindrical bosses a and a, that are arranged thereon at equidistant points. At the base of each boss is provided four radial lugs a', and a', which are located at equidistant points and are arranged upon lines passing through the axes of the diagonal rows of bosses. The lower face of the lens A is preferably recessed, and within such recess is provided with round conical bosses and , which are located at equidistant points, and half-round intersecting ribs and , that are arranged in lines which are parallel with the sides of the lens and directly beneath the spaces between the bosses a. If preferred, the lower face of said lens may have a downward-swelling panel a4, between which and
each of the edges of the lens is left a plain bearing-strip a5, as shown in Figs. 3, 5, and 6. The lens thus constructed is placed within a correspondingly-shaped opening in a supporting-frame B, where its bottom edges a5 and a5 rest upon supporting-ledges b and b in the usual manner. When said lens is thus in place, an encaustic tile C is placed within each space between contiguous bosses, where it is centered by means of the lugs a' and a', after which the spaces between said bosses and encaustic tiles are filled with a suitable cement D. The surface thus produced is composed wholly of glass, encaustic tiles, and cement, and presents the same appearance as though each boss a was a separately formed and set lens, and while equally strong and durable for all practicable purposes is capable of transmitting far more light than tiles of ordinary construction, as the spaces usually occupied between lenses by a metal plate are in this case occupied by glass, which has the same effect as would be secured by increasing materially the area of the lower ends of ordinary lenses.
    In consequence of the combination in one body of several heretofore separate lenses, the number and extent of the joints to be made are materially reduced and the cost of construction correspondingly lessened.
    Having thus described my invention, what I claim is--
    1. As an improvement in illuminating-tiles, a lens which is composed of a plate of glass that has its upper side recessed to cause it to resemble a number of separately-formed lenses, and has on its lower sidle strengthening-ribs that are formed integral with said plate and are arranged beneath and in line with the recesses in its upper side, substantially as and for the purpose specified.
    2. As an improvement in illuminating-tiles, a lens which is composed of a plate of glass that has its upper side recessed to cause it to resemble a number of separately-formed lenses, and has on its lower side intersecting half-round ribs that are formed integral with said plate and are arranged beneath and in line with the recesses in its upper side, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
    3. As an improvement in illuminating-tiles, a lens which is composed of a plate of glass that has its upper side recessed to cause it to