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541,582 · Westermayr · "Device for Furnishing and Distributing Daylight into Dark Rooms, Stores, &c." · Page 1
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Patents: 285 of 511
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
EDWARD WESTERMAYR, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

 
DEVICE FOR FURNISHING AND DISTRIBUTING DAYLIGHT IN DARK ROOMS, STORES, &c.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 541,582, dated June 25, 1895.
Application filed May 16, 1894. Serial No. 611,414. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, EDWARD WESTERMAYR, a citizen of the United States of America, residing in the city, county, and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Device for Furnishing and Distributing Daylight into Dark Rooms, Stores, &c.; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, true, and exact description of the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, making a part of this specification, of which--
    Figure 1 is a plan view of my said device made according to my invention. Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the corrugated glass prepared with three coats or layers of best silver. Figs. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 are detailed views illustrating certain parts of the same.
    This invention is intended to furnish natural or daylight into rooms, lofts, stores, &c., otherwise dark, by means of a diffused form of natural or daylight, which is first diffused by means of the corrugation in glass, Fig. 2, and is then reflected into such rooms, lofts, stores, &c., by means of my said device which consists of a piece of corrugated glass, Fig. 2, fluted horizontally and fastened or adjusted in an iron frame or skeleton C riveted securely and supplied in back with a sheet or sheets e of iron to protect said glass from danger of breaking by jar or sudden contact.
    The glass K is furnished in the back thereof with three coats or layers of silver applied in the usual manner and when this preparation is completed three coats or layers of fine shellac are applied successively to said back of glass K, the object and purpose of which is to protect said silvering on said back of glass K from being damaged or injured by weather, moisture or contact. When said glass K is thus prepared, it is laid into the metallic pan, Fig. 3, after first laying at the bottom of said metallic pan a thin sheet of felt or other fibrous absorbent material f to still further secure said glass K from moisture and atmospheric influences and is securely fastened in the bottom of said metallic pan, Fig. 3, by means of soft brass clamps d', which, after the said glass K is in position, are bent over (e') to hold glass b securely in place, Fig. 5, and the margin thereof is then covered with putty or other suitable
substance a applied in bevel shape. The bottom of said metallic pan e is fastened to the body of the frame c by means of screws g placed at convenient distances apart, the felt or other fibrous absorbent material f being between the back of said glass K and said bottom of metallic pan e thus affording perfect security for said glass K from contact, jar, moisture or atmospheric influences.
    Fig. 5 shows a grooved bracket fastened to the wood work of any window frame J by means of screws. These brackets are furnished with a groove i to permit the ready adjusting of the frame C by means of the device Fig. 6, which is fastened to the frame C by means of two screws d.
    In order to obtain the proper angle for reflecting the natural or daylight into any room, store, loft, &c., it is necessary to unscrew the clamp or vise, until such angle is obtained. Then by fastening said clamp or vise to said brackets, Fig. 5, the frame C is held securely in place while the clamp, Fig. 7, serves to allow the frame C to be moved or slid back and forth to any required distance in groove I and by reversing the position of said device, frame C can thus readily be firmly secured. In the back of frame C is applied a hollow pipe h' allowing the entrance of a piston pole or rod m and being movable serves to permit the ready adjusting of frame C in brackets Fig. 5 at any distance apart.
    Fig. 5, is a bracket made of wrought iron or other suitable material having the required strength to bear the weight it is intended to support, constructed by twisting a bar of cylindrical shaped iron or other suitable material until the ends are brought parallel to each other and about one half inch apart evenly along the entire length thereof thus forming an opening or groove i sufficient to permit of the insertion of pin Fig. 7 furnished with a threaded end and clamp or vise Fig. 7, which when the required distance from the window is arranged, is screwed securely thus preventing the shifting of said clamp or vise, Fig. 7. The threaded pin Fig. 7 forms part of a hollow pipe h', into which a piston rod, m, also furnished at the end thereof with a threaded pin and clamp or vise Fig. 7, is inserted. The hollow pipe h', and piston rod, m, are securely fastened to a pan, C, thus