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595,261 · Basquin · "Device for Selecting Prisms Having Proper Angles" · Page 1
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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
OLIN H. BASQUIN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO THE
LUXFER PRISM PATENTS COMPANY, OF SAME PLACE.

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Olin H. Basquin
27 of 28
DEVICE FOR SELECTING PRISMS HAVING PROPER ANGLES.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letter Patent No. 595,261, dated December 7, 1897.
Application filed October 7, 1897. Serial No. 654,372. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern:
    Be it known that I, OLIN H. BASQUIN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Prism-Finding Devices, of which the following is a specification.
    My invention relates to devices for selecting the proper prisms to be used in a prism-plate under certain given conditions.
    My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein—
    Figure 1 is a plan view of a device embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a view of Fig. 1 with the parts differently disposed. Fig. 3 is a section on line 3 3, Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4, Fig. 1. Fig. 5 shows a ray of light passing through a prism.
    Like letters refer to like parts throughout the several figures.
    When prisms are used in connection with windows, canopies, or the like to produce an increased illuminating effect in an apartment, for example, the angle of the prism will depend upon the direction in which it is desired to have the light leave the prism, the direction in which the light comes before entering the prism, and the index of refraction of the glass from which the prism is made. The object of my present invention is to provide a simple, reliable, and efficient device for finding this angle of the prism when these three factors are known.
    I have shown a portion of a prism-light A, provided with the prisms A', and have indicated the various angles which I shall speak of in connection with my device. The angle at which the light enters the prism may be called "the angle of the incident ray," such angle being the angle B in the drawings. The angle at which the light leaves the prism may be called the "angle of the leaving ray," said angle being the angle C in the drawings. In using this instrument the known quantities are the angle at which the light enters the prism— that is, the angle B— the angle at which the light leaves the prism— that is, the angle C— (both of these angles being the angles which the light makes with the horizontal, or a plane perpendicular to the receiving-face of the prism,) and the index of refraction of the glass.
The index of refraction of course depends upon the glass itself, and is readily found. The unknown quantity, which the present device is adapted to find, is the angle of the prism— namely, the angle D.
    Referring now to Fig. 1, I provide a graduated scale E, which is mounted in any desired manner— as, for example, upon the support E'. As illustrated in the drawings, I have shown this scale as a graduated arc of one hundred and eighty degrees, the graduations being in degrees. The arc is provided with two scales, one, E², beginning at the center E³ and running each way, as shown. This scale may be called the "light-scale." The other scale E4 begins with zero at E5, the ninety-degree mark being located at E². This scale may be called the "prism-scale."
    I have constructed the device so that the same graduations may be used for both scales; but it is of course evident that different graduations might be used and that the parts might be arranged in a different manner. I have arranged the parts in the manner shown for the reason that this appears to be the most convenient arrangement obtainable. At the center of the graduated arc E, I provide a pin F or the like, carrying the block F', working in the slot F² in the arm F³, connected with the prism-angle pointer or indicator F4. A second arm F5 is connected with the prism-angle indicator F4 and is provided with the slot F6. The slot F6 and the slot F² are substantially at right angles to each other. A sliding block F7 works in the slot F6 and is connected with the pointer G, pivotally connected with the pin F and adapted to be moved along the graduated arc. This pointer G indicates the angle at which the ray of light leaves the prism. A second block F8 also works in the slot F6. This block is connected with the pointer H of the index of refraction-scale H', which is pivoted to the pin F. The pointer H and the scale H' slide with relation to each other and are held in any given position by means of the thumb-screw H². The block F8 is connected with a block I, (see Fig. 3,) working in the slot I' in the guide I². This guide is pivoted to the arm I³,