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Patents: 123 of 511

A.D. 1881, 26th JULY. Nº3271.
Glasses or Lenses for Pavement and other Lights.


 
LETTERS PATENT to Andrew McLaren, of Upper Thames Street, in the City of London, Ironfounder, for an Invention of "IMPROVEMENTS IN GLASSES OR LENSES FOR PAVEMENT AND OTHER LIGHTS."



PROVISIONAL SPECIFICATION left by the said Andrew McLaren at the Office of the Commissioners of Patents on the 26th July 1881.

    ANDREW McLAREN, of Upper Thames Street, in the City of London, Iron Founder. "IMPROVEMENTS IN GLASSES OR LENSES FOR PAVEMENT AND OTHER LIGHTS."

    This Invention consists in forming a lenticular or double convex lens with a plane surface for receiving light, and a plane concave combined for dispersing and diffusing light.

    The accompanying Drawing shows the Invention clearly. a is the plane for receiving the light; b, the convex surface; and c, the curve on the lower edge of the prism for reflecting it, the portions b and c reflecting and dispersing the rays of light in a more equable manner than has been done with prisms as hitherto made. The curve c on the lower edge is an important feature, as it conveys the rays of light from it in a radial manner and so distributes them that a greater space is illuminated from the convex face and under the prism than has been found possible with reflectors hitherto made.