Home Index Site Map Up: Glassmaking Navigation
Up: Glassmaking

First: Flat Glass · Cover Last: Flat Glass · Page 73 Prev: Flat Glass · Page 36 Next: Flat Glass · Page 38 Navigation
Flat Glass: 30 of 66
·Cover ·Page 30 ·Page 52
·Page 4 §Page 31 §Page 53
·Page 5 ·Page 32 ·Page 54
·Page 6 ·Page 33 ·Page 55
·Page 7 ·Page 34 ·Page 56
·Page 8 ·Page 35 ·Page 57
·Page 9 ·Page 36 ·Page 58
·Page 11 ·Page 37 §Page 59
·Page 13 ·Page 38 ·Page 60
§Page 17 ·Page 39 ·Page 61
·Page 18 ·Page 40 ·Page 62
·Page 19 ·Page 41 ·Page 63
·Page 20 ·Page 42 ·Page 64
·Page 21 §Page 43 ·Page 65
·Page 22 ·Page 44 ·Page 66
·Page 23 §Page 45 §Page 67
·Page 24 ·Page 46 ·Page 68
§Page 25 ·Page 47 ·Page 69
·Page 26 ·Page 48 ·Page 70
·Page 27 ·Page 49 ·Page 71
·Page 28 ·Page 50 ·Page 72
·Page 29 ·Page 51 ·Page 73
 
the production of sheet glass by this method. The cylinder is laid on a light iron carriage and carefully introduced into the heated interior of the flattening oven and when sufficiently heated it is lifted from the carriage by long iron tools and placed on the flattening stone, a large fire clay slab with a well-polished surface. The split cylinder gradually softens and by means of other tools is spread out upon the stone and then ironed or flattened by rubbing with a block of wood mounted on a long iron handle.
    The "flattening table" containing the stone is revolved and the stone then moved into a cooler chamber, another stone being moved into the hot flattening oven ready to receive another cylinder and the process repeated. The flattened sheet is now picked up by a long-handled fork and placed in the hot end of the annealing oven or lehr, through which it gradually passes, during the annealing process, towards the cool end. The sheets are then