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for the acquisition of this relic just as there was more than a century later among antiquaries and curators.
    Whether Thomas Noble purchased the sign of The Dog's Head in the Pot and set it up over the corner shop in St. George's Terrace, later to be occupied by Haywards, or whether it was Noble's successor, is not recorded. Charles Dickens, as a small boy, noticed the sign in 1823 as he walked backwards and forwards from his home in Lant Street, Southwark, to the blacking factory at Hungerford Stairs, which figures in his autobiographical novel, David Copperfield. "My usual way home," he wrote to his friend and biographer John Forster, "was over Blackfriars Bridge and down that turning in the Blackfriars Road which has Rowland Hill's Chapel on one side and the likeness of a golden dog licking a golden pot over a shop door on the other." From the vestiges of the period which have remained it is still possible to visualise the scene as Dickens saw it a hundred and thirty years ago.
    Earlier still, Rowland Hill had been a familiar figure as he followed the same route to and from his chapel. Little did he know that this was to achieve even greater fame as "The Ring," a boxing arena. "I remember Rowland Hill from my infancy," recorded Charles Mathews, the great mimic and actor, "He was an odd, flighty, absent person. So inattentive was he to nicety in dress that I have seen him enter my father's house (in the Strand) with one red slipper and one shoe, the knees of his breeches untied, and the strings dangling down his legs. In this state he walked from Blackfriars Road unconscious of his eccentric appearance."
    There is one more character to be introduced as taking part in the prologue to the story of Haywards of the Borough-- yet another ironmonger, George Glover, who specialised as a maker of iron fences. Little more than a stone's throw from Noble's shop on the corner, Glover carried on his business in premises at 117, Union Street. Here today stand the headquarters of Haywards Limited.
    An extract from The General Shopbook for 1783 gives an interesting description of ironmongers of that day. "They generally