Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 28 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 30 Navigation
YOR: 30 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
must have suffered to distraction from the polite attentions of his sisters until he too took refuse in the arms of his bride.
    The year 1847 was important for the Hayward family as a whole. John Hayward, head of the family, guardian and guiding influence, died, bequeathing his business in Newgate Street to his son George, with whom he had been in partnership for many years. Having only one daughter who, as an exception to the family rule, had married, he consoled himself in the company of his five nieces who ingratiated themselves sufficiently to be left ten pounds apiece, the daughter merely receiving a portrait of her father.
    The death of the head of the family signalised a marked departure from the established order of things, particularly in the lives of his nephews, who now decided to branch out for themselves. It is not known why Edward and William chose this time to sever the forty years' connection with Chater and Hayward. Possibly, their father's trustee, John Hayward, had been against such a step, and Edward had been waiting until William was experienced enough to enter into a separate partnership with him. The most likely motive, however, was Edward's desire to invest in an enterprise far removed from that in which he had been previously engaged.
    In 1845, a Mr. Henry Leggatt, print and bookseller of 79, Cornhill, had been elected Master of the Worshipful Company of Glass Sellers, and was doubtless known to Edward Hayward. Hayward's first advertisement, 1849 It is probable that Henry Leggatt needed not only a partner but also additional capital to run his fashionable galleries. Such funds as Edward Hayward possessed were tied up in Chater and Hayward. Dissolution of that partnership would have enabled him