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1857, not a decade since Edward and William Hayward had signed their deed of partnership.
    The old sign continued to swing in someone else's favour but apart from its survival on a few old coal plates made by Haywards during that short period and still in use today it ceased to be associated with Hayward Brothers.
    We have come some distance from Bread Street and the family business in glass. During the first phase in Southwark, this material seems to have played little part in the daily trade, but the removal of the headquarters of the brothers to the Union Street works coincides with the reappearance of glass as a cardinal part of the business.
    Pavement lights of iron, glazed with rough cast glass, were brought into the range of manufacture shortly after the removal to Union Street. In those days of ill-lit basements and cellars where candles and oil soon consumed what little fresh air found its way there, these first pavement lights attained immediate popularity. The bulk of the trade, however, remained for some years in iron-made articles. Coal plates of manifold designs, circular and spiral staircases and Sheringham's Ventilator were the main business.
    Being older and more experienced, Edward Hayward was the guiding influence while William acted as his right-hand man. Edward also interested himself in the other enterprise, Leggatt, Hayward and Leggatt, Print Sellers, 79 Cornhill, where he had an office and would often arrange to meet customers and others concerned with the Borough business. In addition to his responsibilities as senior partner in Hayward Brothers, Edward Hayward took a close interest in the more artistic concern. This brought him into touch with the leading painters of the day and the many public personalities who visited the Cornhill galleries to inspect the canvases, engravings and prints on view there. Not least of these was the Duke of Wellington who, shortly before his death in 1852, called to examine the picture painted by T. J. Barker which depicted the historic meeting of his Grace and Marshall