Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 40 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 42 Navigation
YOR: 42 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
brightness, as the reflection comes from inside the body of the glass. Every other description of Pavement Lights allows the rays on entering to disperse equally in all directions, so that not quite half of them can possibly radiate inwards."
    This was sound common sense likely to appeal to those whose one object was to capture light. The exterior merits of the new invention could not be ignored; the surface of the glass lenses was deliberately set a little below the upper edge of the iron net-work, which not only prevented the danger of slipping but also reduced direct pressure on the glass and minimised the risk of cracking or scratching. The best Clear Flint glass was used for the lenses and prices compared favorably with those of the older types. Precise directions were given in the catalogue as to details required from architects, engineers, builders and others desiring estimates, the basic price being fifteen shillings per foot super.
    With the influx of business the offices at 79, Cornhill, between which place and Union Street works the two Hayward brothers divided their time, became as busy as in the busy days of the print selling connection. In the City, across the water towards the south, east of Aldgate Pump and west into fashionable Mayfair and beyond, the work of Edward Hayward was to change the pattern of the streets. The name Hayward, boldly printed in iron, was to outstay the footsteps of generations, many of whom hurried by unheeding this boon to those toiling unseen beneath their feet. Others, more observant, may have paused to consider the benefits bestowed and to wonder how and when the name arose.
    By a happy coincidence, the first pavement light was installed not far from where Cheapside defers to Poultry, an area as familiar to the bygone generations of Haywards as their own name was to become in architectural and engineering circles throughout the world.
    In 1873, it was advisable to vacate the old Cornhill gallery which had been used as a make-shift arrangement while Messrs. Leggatt's business was in abeyance. A lease of premises