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on the first floor of No. 77, Gracechurch Street was signed and here the partners fixed their new headquarters. It was intended "more particularly for samples of our various specialties and for the convenience of those whom it may suit better to call on us in the City than at our works."
    The popularity of the new pavement lights having been proved, an agency was opened in the busy town of Manchester to cover the north of England. The previous year, a small agency had been established in North Street, Brighton, where the Hayward family had some connections. The success of both agencies, added to the lively trade in London and the home counties, made rebuilding and re-organisation of the Borough factory a vital and pressing necessity. In 1875, the two houses, 191 and 193, next to 187/189, Union Street were acquired and adapted to meet the needs of manufacture.
    July of the same year saw the appearance of a new type of stove operated by gas, the Cheerful Gas Stove. This was followed, with some improvements, by the Reflector Gas Cooking Stove, advertised as the only gas stove by which joints and poultry could be roasted as before an open fire. Much ingenuity was displayed in the arrangement of this appliance, the gas burner being placed above the joint and not under. Over the burner was fixed a radiating metal plate to reflect the heat. The same burner being above the joint and beneath the oven (which was surrounded with a case or jacket to increase the heat and so render combustion complete), both roasting and baking were achieved from the single burner, a simple example of domestic economy. The same stove could also be fitted with a movable copper reflector for radiating the heat into a room. The price of a medium-size stove was five guineas. Larger Reflectors for cooking up to twenty dinners cost fifteen pounds and could be fitted with boilers without any additional cost for gas. Other types of gas stove and hot water systems, ranging from fifteen shillings each, were also made.
    An example quoted at the time is as dated in the fare cooked as in price and design. "A joint weighing 9 lbs., a large family pie,