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Semi-prismatic pavement and stall board lights, 1879
Semi-prismatic pavement and stall board lights, 1879

sixty-five. This was a great blow to the firm and its customers and more particularly to William, who, while his brother lived, had been content to take second place. The full weight of the business now fell upon his shoulders.
    Although Edward Hayward had reached a position in life where he could afford merely to hold a watching brief, his was a mind which was ever pressing forward towards new aims. He never really experienced the joys of retirement. Devoted to his wife, Elizabeth, and with no son to follow him, he had come to regard his brother, William, as his rightful successor and the partnership agreement was framed to that end. Edward's invention the Semi-Prismatic Pavement Light, was his personal property which he retained in his name-- perhaps for sentimental reasons-- whilst permitting the firm to exploit it for the common good.
    The senior partner had lived for some years at Abingdon Cottage on Lower Tulse Hill and there he died, being buried in West Norwood Cemetery. Everything he owned went unconditionally to his wife, to whom also he left the care of his only child, a daughter. His affection for the old days in Cornhill, when the great people of the moment strolled in to discuss the merits of the masters and contemporary painters, is illustrated by his first describing himself in his will as a "Print Seller and Picture Dealer", adding the occupation "Manufacturing Ironmonger" almost as