Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 48 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 50 Navigation
YOR: 50 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
an afterthought. Had the solicitor advising him on the preparation of this document paused to consider, he might well have written "Inventor," a title to which, for some reason, Edward Hayward never seems to have laid any claim. Yet, it is for his inventions that he is remembered today. With his final exit from the Southwark scene and with an empty seat in the Gracechurch Street office, the sense of loss must have been severely felt throughout the business.
    For a short space, William Hayward controlled the destinies of Hayward Brothers alone. This was no mean task. For thirty years since the day when the two brothers first entered into partnership one with another in equal shares, their relationship had been governed by a perfect understanding formed in early childhood, and supported by mutual respect and reliability. When one such partner is removed it is difficult to replace him. For a time William Hayward made no attempt to do so.
    The patent of 1871, became vested in Edward's widow and passed by a deed of agreement to William. No sooner had the parchment been signed than William found himself obliged to protect the patent in the courts of law, a situation which the widow in the retirement of her West Malling home, where she had withdrawn from Tulse Hill, could scarcely have faced.
    A man named Hamilton, lately employed by Hayward Brothers and acquainted with all the facets of manufacture and method at Union Street works, chose this time to establish a business in pavement lights in Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, a project in which his father joined. Independence is a find thing and no one could quarrel with it. The Haywards had always realised that their own prosperity had its roots in independence. William Haywards chief objection, however, was to the nature of the Hamiltons' business which far from being independent was based upon the patent of 1871.
    This was the position when in 1876 a new figure appeared who was destined to make an important contribution to the success of the firm. This was William Eckstein who like the Haywards