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to install them in the Government Printing Office but also to furnish a testimonial as to their efficiency.
    The following year, extensions were added to the Union Street works where land at the rear of the original four cottages had been acquired. A second gold medal was earned at the International Health Exhibition and the highest award at the Fisheries Exhibition, both held in 1883.
    The centenary of the firm passed almost unnoticed. Family firms were then the rule rather than the exception they have become today and William Hayward had been so many years younger than Edward that he hardly remembered his own father or anything of the long line of Haywards before that. But, the hundred years' mark passed, the firm settled down to a long period of laurels bestowed at many exhibitions.
    In 1888, despite the considerable extensions made shortly before, further building was necessary as an annexe was added to cover the immediate requirements. It was plain, however, that this must be merely a temporary measure and that with the present trend of trade the new building would be outgrown before the turn of the century.
    Memories of the misguided Hamiltons were recalled about this time with another infringement of Haywards' patent, by the Pavement Light Company. The case was heard before Mr. Justice Kay with similar favourable results. Mr. Carpmael, Counsel for Haywards, instructed by Wilson, Bristow and Carpmael, was able on this occasion to conduct his case, so to speak, "on his head." As the Hamiltons had been, the Pavement Light Company was swallowed up in the mists of litigation and was heard of no more.
    In the daily administration of the partnership, William Hayward and William Eckstein were almost imperceptibly changing places. The last of the Haywards-- at least in the sense of this book, other branches of the family having prospered elsewhere-- was well into his sixties, whereas Eckstein was a young and vigorous engineer with new methods and ideas. William Hayward was not a man to stand in the way of these and there is every