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Now, however, he was assisted by three junior partners, and in October it was possible to despatch J. Gray to South America where his work brought great credit and profit to the company.
    The first four years of the reign of George V from 1910 brought further prosperity. Some appointments were made during this time which were to have a marked effect on the firm's future. Among them were those of H. T. Walker, as general manager, and A. F. Benjamin, an architect by profession and cousin to A. L. Collins. Shortly after joining the company, Benjamin was raised to the Board and concerned himself mainly with the electro-glazing or Copperlite, which was receiving fierce competition from a company engaged in a similar type of production.
    Eckstein's talent for advertising stood the company in good stead when establishing the reputation of Copperlite, and a campaign was initiated to force the glazing on the notice of buyers. A very stringent fire test had proved its quality and the facts being brought to the attention of those likely to be interested, the wisdom of Eckstein's vigorous campaign, supported by Benjamin's hard work, was apparent. Orders were soon accumulating in large numbers and before long it was necessary to engage a night shift to satisfy these.
    Another newcomer at this period was A. T. Davies, the present Managing Directory and Vice-Chairman of Haywards Limited. He had been trained as an architect and it was felt that a company so closely concerned with the architectural world should themselves employ an architect who, in addition to his professional knowledge, could steep himself in the details of the trade. The subsequent achievement of Mr. Davies, who started in the Roofing Department in 1912 and became manager of the Glazing Department a year later, strongly endorsed the wisdom of this policy. Architects were quick to realise that here was someone who could see and discuss their problems from both angles. The appointment also meant that the company's own architectural requirements could to a large extend be met within their own organisation.