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behind him the striking successes achieved in Reform glazing and light constructional work. Soon the directors and their agents were surveying London and its environs for a convenient site to which part of the production might be transferred. This was planned to take place gradually so as to disturb production as little as possible.
    After several possibilities had been examined and dismissed as not possessing all the qualities required, six acres of land at Enfield in Middlesex were purchased. The selection of this site was governed by three factors. It was near to a railway, adjacent to the main London road to the North and not far from the River Lea with direct access to the Thames.
    As a preliminary, the company asked their architect, A. T. Davies, to prepare plans for a building 160 feet square and consisting of four 40 feet bays. These were to accommodate the Stair and Door Departments which it was proposed should be the first to be moved from Southwark. Orders were given early in 1920 to the various contractors and by April 1921 the new building was completed. The Enfield project, a long cherished idea, became an accomplished fact.
    "Haywards of the Borough," an association both of names and ideas, was so well known that it was considered too good an asset to throw away. Moreover, some reluctance was felt at the idea of leaving the Borough, where from those early days, Haywards had made their wares under the eye of partners and later directors who had rubbed shoulders daily with their workmen and forged the close personal relationship which had served so well. Expansion, nonetheless, was not only desirable but inevitable. Central direction of the firm's affairs must obviously continue. Enfield, of course, was some distance out of London. This prompted the Board to retain headquarters and part at least of the Union Street works for that section of the manufacture more usefully carried out in the Borough.
    This resolved, the Orange Street factory built in 1918 was sold to the Scandinavian Belt Company, and the lantern light and