Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 84 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 86 Navigation
YOR: 86 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
glazing departments removed to Enfield. Here, the spaciousness of the new works was in direct contrast to the cramped conditions of the old.
    In 1922, two houses were erected at Enfield for the accommodation of the Works Manager and to serve as a local office. In November of this year, further extensions were authorised by the Board. Another important decision at this date was to open West End offices in Kingsway, from which place the company's London representatives could operate with greater ease and efficiency. These new offices, being near most of the leading London architects, spared representatives, as they do today, the tedium and delay in continually travelling backwards and forwards from Union Street to Central London.
    A new element of competition became apparent during the post-Great War period in the form of concrete pavement lights. So far, this development was no more than a speck on the Hayward horizon. It was an experiment and how it would work out was not yet known. If it gained a foothold, then clearly it would encroach more and more upon Haywards' trade. This new mode of manufacture did not come, as might be expected, from a concern specialising in pavement lights and its ancillaries but from a company originally engaged in producing concrete slabs.
    The spirit of the old Hayward brothers lived on and although the directors noted this new element with concern they did not improvise hasty or ill-considered methods of combating the threat, but quietly continued their own development whilst keeping a weather eye on the situation.
    By mid-summer 1923, the commitments at Enfield had grown so heavy that it was advisable to arrange for a resident director. H. T. Walker, who had been so closely associated with bringing the new works into existence, was the obvious choice. He readily accepted an invitation to take on this additional responsibility at Enfield. A canteen was opened, cricket, football and tennis equipment was bought and gradually the sports and social side of the company's activities assumed an importance reflected not only in