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    On the production side, a new situation had arisen. The company's purchases of iron castings from Abbots Foundry Co. Ltd., of Falkirk, had grown to such an extent that closer association with them was politic. It was ultimately agreed that Haywards should purchase an interest in Abbots.
    This transaction had not long been completed before the company suffered the loss of its Chairman, J. A. Willmore, barely five years after that of his predecessor, Extone. Another link was severed but Haywards were fortunate in that the traditions of the past were still preserved in name by J. G. Willmore, son of the late Chairman. J. A. Willmore was succeeded as Chairman by A. L. Collins.
    The purchase of Abbots' shares had carried with it the privilege of nominating a director to serve on their board and H. T. Walker had been appointed. But shortly after this a merger of many large iron-founders in England and Scotland took place under the name of Allied Ironfounders Ltd. Haywards' orders for iron castings were a very small proportion of the total controlled by this gigantic enterprise and accordingly H. T. Walker tendered his resignation from Abbots' Board.
    In 1928, A. T. Davies was appointed a director. The older generation was making way for the younger men. Those who knew the Haywards personally were being replaced by others who knew them only by repute.
    Meanwhile, a big problem which had been growing during the past decade confronted the Board. It could no longer be ignored. On the eve of a slump which spread over the entire face of the world, the directors put aside other preoccupations and resolved to face it.
    The problem was whether to embark upon the production of concrete pavement lights.
    The degree of conservatism found in older men who knew the value of proved and accepted principles, allied to the robust state of the business in iron-framed pavement lights, had perhaps coloured the attitude of Haywards to the revolutionary methods being pursued elsewhere.