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    In the meantime, some war contracts had been secured but these were far below normal capacity. This somewhat negative existence dragged on for nearly a year until suddenly the Air Ministry requisitioned a third of the productive floor space at Enfield for aircraft production. Essential though this was, it dealt Haywards a severe blow at the time when the bombing was at its height. There seemed little chance of hitting back by a full-blooded contribution to the war effort.
    It was with a sense of thankfulness, therefore, that the company greeted the summons to assist in war production. The Government had set up machinery whereby certain companies were grouped together, responsible to a "parent" company-- in this instance, Moreland, Hayne and Company, the well-known structural engineers-- so that close collaboration between companies producing components was possible. In 1942, after the country had survived the first violent air assaults, Haywards, as members of this group were given a contract for large consignments of Bailey Bridge components to form those bridges extensively used by the armed forces overseas. This called for a high degree of accuracy and craftsmanship, as well as a maximum output. Parts for the Mulberry Harbour installations were also made by Haywards, under the group system, while other contracts were for articles of so secret a character that neither the workmen nor the directors knew exactly for what purpose they were intended. The main thing was that the company could exert itself to its limit in common with the rest of industry in forcing the greatest struggle in the history of mankind to a victorious conclusion.
    Many war requirements were met from the company's peace-time supplies. At the Borough works, thousands of roof ventilators for huts, black-out ventilators and other items were made during this period. As time went on more and more female labour was employed.
    Haywards were exceedingly fortunate in suffering little major damage from the raids. In the vicinity, notably in Southwark, the damage was on the scale typical of most central areas.