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Luciflex Prism Lighting Co.
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US: 42 of 69

Location:

  • Main Office, 1021 Land Title Building, Philadelphia, PA

Timeline:

  • ?-1915-?

History:

  • None.

Paper:

Luciflex Prism Lighting Co ad in American Contractor, Feb 6, 1915

Reinforced Concrete Sidewalk Lights

In wearing qualities, appearance, ease of installation, and general practicability, the Luciflex System of Reinforced Concrete Sidewalk and Vault Lights is universally recognized as the standard. it is composed of glass prisms or lenses embedded in 3¼ inches of concrete, reinforced by longitudinal and transverse steel tension rods placed between the glass units, thus forming a mesh of great rigidity. These form panels of glass and concrete, which are supported upon retaining walls and beams, or concrete trusses placed at proper intervals to provide for water-tight expansion, joints placed at requisite intervals.
The only system that glass can be replaced without breaking surrounding cement.
No breakage of glass from expansion and contraction.

Absolutely Waterproof

The "Luciflex" system is absolutely waterproof. The collar sets firmly in the cement, in the same manner as fruit jars. In order to preclude any possibility of leakage, the "Luciflex" Waterproof Cement is inserted between glass and metal collars, making am absolutely water-tight joint.

Guarantee

The "Luciflex" guarantees its construction for a period of five years, thoroughly water-tight installation, and glass that will not chip or shale. The far-seeing purchaser will not consider the slight increase of first cost over the different inferior types of vault light construction that have been so generally used in an effort to reduce building cost, but which have an average life of one year, after which replacement is usually necessary.

American Contractor, Feb 6, 1915, via Philadelphia as Advertised and Google Books

Gallery:

  • None.