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LUXFER PRISMS EXPLAINED.

    The natural light of a room comes directly from the sky, strikes the floor within ten or twenty feet of the window, and is almost entirely lost upon the floor. The quantity of light utilized for illuminating a room is very small in comparison with that which enters the window. When light passes from air to glass it undergoes a change of direction. This is refraction. It is this property of light that has been utilized in the Luxfer method of lighting buildings. Luxfer Prisms are of glass, having one side formed into prisms. These have been put into a practical form by the process of electro-glazing. By means of electricity the edges of the prism lenses are so welded together by a narrow line of copper that the finished product is not only attractive in appearance, but has also the desired stiffness for use in large frames. In this new system the light is received upon the outer face of this composite plate, and by means of the prisms is throw back into the room, falling directly upon the objects to be lighted instead of being wasted on the floor. No light is lost, no light is created, but through the Luxfer Prisms daylight is diffused throughout the interior space; a simple, certain method of giving to interiors the great desideratum of natural light at a cost so small that at least 100 per cent annual dividends are paid upon the investment in resultant economy. Luxfer Prisms do not create light, but if placed where reached by a fair volume of light from the sky, will transfer the light where needed. Basements can be lighted to any desired degree by the use of Luxfer Pavement Prisms set in iron frames placed in the sidewalk, with vertical frames (technically called lucidux frames) of prism plates of the required prescription hung below and opposite. The combination of the pavement prisms and the prism plates is essential where a basement is to be lighted, the one being a necessary complement to the other. A very limited amount of the combined product will introduce more daylight into a basement than an unlimited quantity of any other form of sidewalk lights.
  Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 11