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477 · Moffat & Dobbins · "Improvements in Light-projecting Glasses for Windows and the like" · Page 1
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Nº 477 British Patent Office seal A.D. 1900 First: 637,145 · Moffat & Dobbins · "Light-Projecting Glass" · Page 1 Last: 71590 · Moffat & Dobbins · "Improvements in Light Projecting Glasses" · Drawing Prev: 637,145 · Moffat & Dobbins · "Light-Projecting Glass" · Page 1 Next: 71590 · Moffat & Dobbins · "Improvements in Light Projecting Glasses" · Page 1 Navigation
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(Under International Convention.)

Date claimed for Patent under Sect. 103 of Act,
- being date of first Foreign Application
(in United States)
} 9th June, 1899
Date of Application (in United Kingdom), 8th Jan., 1900
Complete specification Left, 8th Jan., 1900—Accepted, 10th Mar., 1900

COMPLETE SPECIFICATION

Improvements in Light-projecting Glasses for Windows and the like.

We, GEORGE MOFFAT, of 1715, Mount Vernon Street, in the City of Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania, one of the United States of America, Electrical Engineer, and EDWARD JOHN DOBBINS, of 1908, Market Street, in the City of Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania, one of the United States of America, Iron Worker, do hereby declare the nature of this invention and in what manner the same is to be performed to be particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement:—

Our invention relates to that class of light-projecting glasses which have upon one side a series of parallel prism bars for reflecting or refracting the light, the object of our invention being to so construct such a light-projecting glass that the field from which the same receives its light will be enlarged and greater diffusion of the light effected so as to materially increase the area to which light is supplied by the glass.
In the accompanying drawings:—
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a piece of light-projecting glass constructed in accordance with our invention.
Fig. 2 is a section of the same on the line a-a; and
Fig. 3 is a section on the line b-b.
Our improved light-projecting glass has upon one side parallel prism bars 1 and upon the opposite side parallel lens bars 2, disposed substantially at a right angle in respect to the prism bars, these lens bars presenting outer convex faces, as shown in Fig. 1. In the present instance each of the prism bars has a plane face and a curved or lens like face 4 for a purpose explained hereinafter; but other forms of prism bar may be used without departing from the main feature of our invention.
The purpose of such lens bars is to materially increase the effective area of the source from which the glass derives its illumination, lateral rays being caught and transmitted by the convex surfaces of the lens bars, which would be lost by reflection from a flat surface or from a glass presenting a considerable area of flat surface on the light receiving side, all of the rays, moreover, being refracted by the lens without that interference with each other which is an objection to light-projecting glasses in which some of the light is transmitted directly, while other rays are refracted and reflected across the path of the direct rays, thus

[Price 8d.]