Home Index Site Map Up: Glassmaking Navigation
Up: Glassmaking

First: Royal Institution of Great Britain · The Making of a Sheet of Glass · Page 1 Last: Royal Institution of Great Britain · The Making of a Sheet of Glass · Page 28 Prev: Royal Institution of Great Britain · The Making of a Sheet of Glass · Page 20 Next: Royal Institution of Great Britain · The Making of a Sheet of Glass · Page 22 Navigation
Sheet of Glass
17 of 23

·Page 1
·Page 2
·Page 3
·Page 4
·Page 5
·Page 6
·Page 8
·Page 9
·Page 10
·Page 11
·Page 13
·Page 14
·Page 16
·Page 17
·Page 18
·Page 20
·Page 21
·Page 22
·Page 23
·Page 25
·Page 26
·Page 27
·Page 28
 
is used as for the old teeming process. The overhead crane carrying what is known as a goose-neck, takes up and drags out the red hot pot, which is taken away on a truck and put in the teeming crane, which empties the pot behind the casting rollers.
    Figure 5 shows the pot being teemed, the glass sheet flowing down an incline and being taken up by the travelling tables. Down comes the guillotine and the irregular front end of the plate has been cut off. Down comes the guillotine again and the sheet is made. The table carrying the glass travels forward in front of the lehr and a stowing machine pushes the plate into the first kiln. The plate then travels down the lehr and emerges ready to be cut on the cutting tables at the cold end.
    The plate, when cut, is lifted up by means of an apparatus known as a "sucker" (Figure 6), which transfers it to a travelling carriage, by which it is carried to the grinding shed. The great advantage of this over the table process is that a much smoother and flatter sheet is obtained and consequently there is less loss of time and material in the grinding operation.
    CONTINUOUS CASTING PROCESS. The most modern process of all is one which we are now using in addition to the Bicheroux and which owes its origin to one of Mr. Henry Ford's staff. By this process the glass is melted in tanks which may contain as much as 600 tons and which are somewhat similar in design to the sheet glass tanks. The apparatus occupies a space of about 500 feet in length. The molten glass is discharged in the form of a stream between two forming rolls from which it issues in the form of a continuous sheet or