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Sheet of Glass
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which is circular, and useless pieces of polished glass are made.
2. The whole of the glass covering the large table having an area of about 1,000 sq. ft. has to be ground down to the point of minimum thickness.
3. Additional handling causes accidents.
    CONTINUOUS PROCESS. At the same time that the Ford Motor Company devised their process of continuous rolling from a tank, they introduced a new continuous method of grinding and polishing, but this idea had already been anticipated and put into operation at St. Helens. The invention was the conception of one of our staff, Mr. F. B. Waldron, and in this process the rough glass, instead of being mounted on circular rotatable tables, is laid on rectangular tables, which are coupled together so as to give a continuous train which passes forward under first grinders and then polishers. In the Pilkington process the tables are slidingly supported on guides and so coupled together as to give a continuous bed on which the glass can be laid regardless of the joints between the tables. The continuous bed of tables moves steadily forward at the rate of about 60 inches a minute. As the table moves forward the glass, which is 100" wide, is lowered by means of a sucker on to the table and is bedded down either with plaster or on wet cloth. The whole machine covers a length of 680 feet.
    In connection with the grinding process mention must be made of the waste product that it creates. When the grinding sand has done its work it has to be got rid of. It is contaminated by iron, plaster, glass and emery, and has a degree of fineness which makes it unsuitable for any purpose. Therefore, it has to be pumped away