Home Index Site Map Up: Glassmaking Navigation
Up: Glassmaking

First: How It Is Made · The Manufacture of Glass · Page 117 Last: How It Is Made · The Manufacture of Glass · Page 131 Prev: How It Is Made · The Manufacture of Glass · Page 125 Next: How It Is Made · The Manufacture of Glass · Page 127 Navigation
How It Is Made
10 of 15

·Page 117
·Page 118
·Page 119
·Page 120
·Page 121
·Page 122
·Page 123
·Page 124
·Page 125
·Page 126
·Page 127
·Page 128
·Page 129
·Page 130
·Page 131
 
furnace, where it is placed on end and gradually cooled.
    The largest sheets made measure about 7 feet by 4 feet, but only few workmen are sufficiently skilful to blow the cylinders required for such sizes. Sheet-glass is classed by the number of ounces that a square foot of it weighs--"12-oz.," "18-oz.," "20-oz." glass.
    Blowing and drawing and shaping by hand are used in combination for such things as wine glasses and vases (Fig. 57), which begin as a bulb, have stems drawn from the tip by the application of an iron rod, and, after being detached from the blowpipe, are reheated and shaped by the pressure of a tool on the free edge. Glass tubes are made by drawing out a bulb of glass from both ends, the size depending on the speed at which the drawing is done; glass rods by similarly extending a solid mass of glass.


GLASS-ROLLING

is necessary for the manufacture of very thick sheet-glass, generally known as plate-glass. The apparatus used is a large flat iron table over which a roller is run, resting at each end on two strips of iron of the thickness of the plate required. The width of the