Home Index Site Map Up: Paper Navigation
Up: Paper

First: Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 1 Last: Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 287 Prev: Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 99 Next: Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 101 Navigation
Handbook: 100 of 287
·1 ·29 ·57 ·85 ·113 ·141 ·169 ·202 ·232 ·260
·2 ·30 ·58 ·86 ·114 ·142 ·170 ·205 ·233 ·261
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87 ·115 ·143 ·171 ·206 ·234 ·262
·4 ·32 ·60 ·88 ·116 ·144 ·172 ·207 ·235 ·263
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89 ·117 ·145 ·173 ·208 §236 ·264
·6 ·34 ·62 ·90 ·118 ·146 ·174 ·209 ·237 ·265
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91 ·119 ·147 ·175 ·210 ·238 §266
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92 ·120 ·148 ·176 ·211 ·239 ·267
·9 ·37 ·65 ·93 ·121 ·149 ·177 ·212 ·240 ·268
·10 ·38 ·66 ·94 ·122 ·150  ... ·213 ·241 ·269
§11 ·39 ·67 ·95 ·123 ·151 §186 ·214 ·242 ·270
·12 ·40 ·68 ·96 ·124 ·152 ·187 ·215 ·243 §271
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97 ·125 ·153 ·188 ·216 ·244 ·272
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98 ·126 ·154 ·189 ·217 ·245 ·273
§15 ·43 ·71 ·99 ·127 ·155 ·190 ·218 §246 ·274
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100 ·128 ·156 ·191 ·219 ·247 ·275
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101 ·129 ·157 ·192 ·220 ·248 ·276
§18 ·46 ·74 ·102 ·130 ·158 ·193 ·221 ·249 ·277
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103 ·131 ·159 ·194 ·222 ·250 ·278
·20 ·48 ·76 §104 ·132 ·160 ·195 ·223 ·251 ·279
§21 ·49 ·77 ·105 ·133 ·161 ·196 ·224 ·252 §280
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106 ·134 ·162 ·197 ·225 ·253 ·281
·23 ·51 §79 ·107 ·135 ·163 §198 ·226 ·254 ·282
·24 ·52 ·80 ·108 ·136 ·164 ·199 ·227 ·255 §283
·25 ·53 ·81 ·109 ·137 ·165 ·200 ·228 ·256 ·284
·26 ·54 ·82 ·110 ·138 ·166 ·201 ·229 ·257 ·285
·27 ·55 ·83 ·111 ·139 ·167 ·202 ·230 ·258 ·286
§28 ·56 ·84 ·112 ·140 ·168 ·203 ·231 ·259 ·287
 

DECORATION OF ROOMS.

    When light falls upon any opaque surface, some of it is reflected or diffused, but some of it is absorbed and lost so far as illumination is concerned. Light which is thrown off from a body determines the color of the body and the shade. In a red body practically all the light is absorbed excepting a small part of the red. In order to illuminate rooms in a satisfactory manner, it is desirable that the walls shall not absorb a large part of the light. There are two advantages: First, the smaller area of prisms needed; and second, the reduction of shadows; for it is not to be forgotten that illumination derived from many different directions is much more valuable and pleasing to the eye than the same amount of illumination from only one or two directions.
    Colors giving the most agreeable results shade from a light cream to a soft yellow. As the clear white light of the prisms is tempered and warmed by the reflection of these tones, the quality of sunlight is thereby more nearly obtained. Light tones of red, orange, tan and green are to be preferred to the cooler blues for the same reason.
    THE TABLE OF PRISM AREAS has been made out on the assumption that the walls of the room are very light in color. In another place is given a sample set of colors and a table which shows the percentage of light absorbed by each color, and also for each color a correcting factor by which the areas given in the Table of Prism Areas should be multiplied, if a room is to be decorated in the corresponding color.


Window Shades.

    The prisms which are designed to illuminate a room take their light from the sky. Inasmuch as the sky is not always of the same brightness, and since the prisms are calculated to given sufficient light under ordinary conditions, it very frequently happens, especially in a southern exposure, that the light obtained in the middle of the day is entirely too bright for the convenience of the tenant. In order to reduce the light thus obtained under these circumstances, ordinary white Holland shades should always be provided, which may be
  Pocket Hand-Book of Electro-Glazed Luxfer Prisms - Page 100