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personal interests proved how far he was prepared to go in the company's service. Enfield had largely been his idea and he was determined to see it through to the end.
    It became desirable in 1952 to release Mr. Coughin from the office of company secretary and G. W. Trehane, who had joined the company in 1930 and had gained a wide experience in various departments from which he graduated to become the company's accountant, was appointed to that office.
    The following year the company adopted a staff pension scheme to secure the future welfare of its employees.
    The company was soon to lose another old friend. Early in 1953, the oldest surviving director, J. G. Willmore, with service dating well over sixty years died suddenly "in harness." Such memories as he might have had of those far-off days when the firm's letters were written by hand, when horses and carts served where now lorries are employed, when old William Hayward was still a regular attendant at the office, and when Enfield was a tiny village only to be found on large-scale maps, such memories as these he had intended to recount for the purpose of this history. With his sudden death, they passed away with him.
    It was fortunate that during the immediate post-war years the company had the advantage of the counsels of its three most senior directors, A. L. Collins, H. T. Walker and J. G. Willmore, mustering between them a century and a half of service. Each, in his turn, made his last contribution before quitting a scene he had known so long. This provided a breathing space for those who were to follow while they combated and, to a large extent, overcame the abnormal conditions then prevailing.
    Life at Haywards during those years reflected that of the nation, and like the nation the company speedily adapted itself to make the best of things. It was not merely a question of treading water until the tide should turn but of swimming against the current of events in the hope of easing the general plight. The result of taking this broader view was that in serving its own interests, the company also served those of the country.