Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 101 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 103 Navigation
YOR: 103 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
    Their answer to the power shortage of 1947 was the prompt installation at Enfield of diesel engines to safeguard production. Contracts for power station requirements were accorded the utmost priority and concrete roof-lights, stairs and steel doors were supplied to many stations so that the needs of others could be met as soon as possible. The steel shortage called for much ingenuity both in the drawing office and in the works, the devising of practical alternatives for materials and parts no longer obtainable. The use of aluminium was in part the company's solution to this problem and an established market in aluminium glazing bars (considered more suitable for certain purposes than the heavier, scarcer steel) owned its growth largely to the shortage of steel. As with power stations, so orders received from steel-producing works were given priority over other less urgent work.
    Haywards' production and public policy therefore ran parallel. The schools' construction programme brought contracts for roof-glazing, lantern lights and windows. Obviously, the sooner these demands could be satisfied, the sooner the schools could function. Work for various universities was also a feature of the company's endeavours in this direction.
    It would be difficult to examine any aspect of the national rehabilitation without discovering some part Haywards had played. In atomic research, their work was visible at Harwell and Glasgow University and in oil refineries, at Ellesmere, Fawley and the Isle of Grain. The defence programme brought orders from aircraft factories, army centres and naval establishments. In mining districts, pit-head baths were furnished with lanterns and concrete roof-lights from the Enfield works. In factories, schools and other places, cooker hoods for kitchens and canteens came from the Union Street works, where a department specialises in this type of manufacture.
    The supply of lantern lights to Buckingham Palace at this time was an echo of the provision seventy years earlier of iron stalls and other stable fittings for the horses of another queen. And if the spirit of Guy Fawkes still lurks in the precincts of the