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Revd. Samuel Hayward (1718-57) In 1757, at the height of his powers and when he was barely thirty-nine years of age, he died. His epitaph reads:
"Hayward undaunted met his nature's foe
And smiled exulting as he felt the blow."
A hundred years later, his sermons were still being published and read.
    The founder of Haywards Limited was only five years of age when his father, the Reverend Samuel Hayward, died. Unfortunately no record of how and where he spent his early days has been preserved. When young Samuel Hayward set up for himself in the glass trade, he described himself as a "glass-cutter and glazier." The distinction been the crafts is fine, but it tells us that even at that early stage the Haywards, having started a job, preferred to see it through. "The business of the glazier," according to a reference book of the period, "may be confined to the mere fitting and setting of glass, even the cutting up of the plates into squares being generally an independent art requiring a degree of tact and judgment not necessarily possessed by the building artificer."
    Of the many guilds representing the various trades in the City, that of the glass sellers was of comparatively recent date. For example the Ironmongers' Company had been incorporated in the reign of Edward IV, just three hundred years before Samuel Hayward started business. The Worshipful Company of Glass Sellers, the members of which sold drinking glasses and other vessels as well as window-glass and mirrors, was not formed until two centuries later when Charles II was on the throne.
    The glass trade had been severely restricted. In 1615, Admiral Sir Robert Mansell, Treasurer of the Royal Navy, possessed the sole right of manufacturing glass in England, a privilege he retained for thirty years.